December 17

 

Reflection

“O Wisdom, O holy Word of God, you govern all creation with your strong yet tender care.
Come and show your people the way to salvation.”

In today’s O Antiphon, we are invited to envision Jesus as Wisdom, the holy Word of God.  Wisdom is the foundation of holiness, or right living. It is wisdom from whom we learn prudence. We are invited to trust that Jesus’ life and words are the way to live with spiritual integrity. We want to emerge from our confusion, contradictions, and chaos, and to welcome Jesus into our lives as a source of Wisdom. Our spirits long for insight into life. How can we be spiritually strong, yet tender in our personal relationships? How can we be the same in our responsibilities as world citizens?  Where do we find direction to guide our actions? The cry “Come” is repeated in the liturgy again and again, insistent and hope-filled. “Come and show your people the way…”

Prayer

Jesus fill me with your wisdom and guide me as I try to live my life with spiritual integrity.

Action

Today reflect on one experience in your life that fills you with doubts about how to act. Reflect on the teachings of Jesus and search for wisdom.

Suggested Reading

God is the source of your life in Christ Jesus, who became for us wisdom from God, and righteousness and sanctification and redemption.
1Cor. 1:30

But the wisdom that comes from heaven is first of all pure; then peace-loving, considerate, submissive, full of mercy and good fruit, impartial and sincere. James 3:17

She reaches from end to end mightily and governs all things well.
Wisdom 8:1

Wonderful is His counsel and great is His wisdom.
Isaiah 28:29

Wisdom is a sacred communion.
Victor Hugo

Wisdom begins in wonder.
Socrates

Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom.
Victor Hugo

Note:

The “O Antiphons” are scripturally based short prayers that are recited or chanted during Vespers of the Liturgy of the Hours. Each antiphon highlights a title for the Messiah and a Messianic prophecy of Isaiah.
The “O Antiphons” have been part of the Church’s liturgical prayer since the 8th or 9th centuries and express the community’s deep longing for the coming of the Messiah.
The “O Antiphons” begin on December 17 and continue until December 23. They are prayed both at the beginning and the end of the Canticle of Mary, and celebrate the coming of the Lord in a unique way.

 

 

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